How to Draw: Ears

Ears… they aren’t just blobs on the side of everyone’s head and neither are they just C-shaped attachments. They are something that is different on each person. They have a lot of character, though not nearly as much as other portions of the face. As I said in the last post of the series (you can find it here), this is going to be the easiest to draw of anything that the human face comprises.

If you are new to this series welcome! You can find the rest of the episodes on this page. I’m covering how to draw all the subjects of the human face so that you can enjoy drawing portraits with confidence and ease. These skills and techniques are also very important for landscape pictures that may have people in them. And the first two episodes are actually the very base foundation which all of the pencil drawing world rests upon – whether you’re drawing portraits, landscapes, cityscapes, or anything! Continue reading “How to Draw: Ears”

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How to Draw: Eyes

“Eyes are the window to the soul.”  I’ve always heard that quote, but it wasn’t till recently that I realized just how true it is. We can hide anything by acting, dressing, or talking differently yet our eyes will tell the truth. Eyes are the most fun and beautiful thing to draw of a human face. They’re not really all that complicated, yet they add such depth and meaning to the portrait. Eyes communicate so much! This is not to scare you out of drawing eyes because you think you’ll flub it up. You are a human, and naturally carry the intuition necessary to subconsciously pick up on the little things that make the eyes their own personality and draw it. As you continue to grow in your drawing, the “drawing it” part will become easier. Continue reading “How to Draw: Eyes”

How to Draw: Sketching and Shading

In the first episode of this How to Draw Series, we learned what tools we need to draw with. Now I’m going to share my top secrets to sketching and shading. Secrets?? Oh yeah, there’s lots of secrets! Ones that I wish I’d known a long time ago, and I’m going to reveal them to you so that drawing no longer has to be such a mystery.

The next best thing to having the things to draw with, is knowing how to use them in a way that really puts a picture together (pun intended).

Using a Grid:

IMG_3199 Continue reading “How to Draw: Sketching and Shading”

How to Draw: The Drawing Tools

This is the first post of a series about how to draw. In the series, we will be covering anything from noses to ears to hair. By the time we get through them all, I am confident that you will be quite prepared to draw a beautiful face! But first things first, we’ve got to start with some tools in hand. A portrait can be drawn with just a regular pencil/eraser/paper, but the results will not be half as pleasing. I see most of the following items as the artist’s most essential items.

The great thing about graphite (pencil) drawing, is that the prices are way lower than painting. Good news for the beginner!

The very most important thing in an aspiring artist, is not the tools, but passion. A love for drawing, not particularly a very developed love yet, but one that doesn’t give up easily. Continue reading “How to Draw: The Drawing Tools”

Musical Education: How to Practice for Excellent Results (Part 2)

For obvious reasons, practice is the most important thing for learning and mastering a piece of music. Anyone can practice, but not everybody knows how to practice. “What on earth is she talking about? Practice is practice,” you may be thinking right now. But randomly running through a song a hundred times isn’t going to give you the results that you’re looking for.

Below I have listed out all the tips that I have found extremely useful in learning a piece of music and mastering it. Not that I’m a pro or anything; if they were all my ideas, I wouldn’t venture to say them. But they are all used by the pros, so they are tried and true to help you get the farthest. Continue reading “Musical Education: How to Practice for Excellent Results (Part 2)”

How to Draw a Face Correctly (Even if You’re not an Artist)

Often times, how-to art books explain everything but the very basics. Most of them make you feel like you would have to be somewhat of an artist already to even try to do what they tell you will work.

For me, it was so extremely helpful to find out what composes a person’s face, and  where to put things. The eyes, nose, etc. So I have made a very straight forward list for you, that I hope will be helpful in figuring things out. Please, it is not actually a hard thing to learn if you have the right foundations to start from (a good attitude about drawing is great too.). So relax, it’s not scary. If at first you don’t succeed, try again.

Proportions

  1. The eyes. If the person in the picture is looking straight at you, you will have five eye widths at the level of the eyes. In other words, the width of one of the eyes will be the width between the side of the head and the eye, and between the eyes. The eyes are also placed exactly in the middle of the head from top to bottom.
  2. The nose. This is a facial feature that is almost always gotten wrong. The length of the nose is basically the same as the width of the eye. The wings of the nose should be at least as far over as the inner corner of the eyes.
  3. The mouth. The mouth is placed a third of the way between the nose and the bottom of the chin; that is, being the closest third to the nose. If the person is smiling, the edge of the mouth will be directly below the pupil of the eye (if the person is looking straight at you.).
  4. The ears. The ear tops generally are in line with the eye brows. The bottoms are generally in line with the bottom of the nose.

As far as the rest of the face, play around with it! It’s no science.

Other important tips

  1. Go off a picture. Truthfully, the best place to start drawing realistic faces, is to grab a nice black and white photo and copy it, and preferably a friend or family member. Doing it this way, you will be able to get a far better picture and learn how the shape of the eyes, ears, mouth, nose, and everything in between, is composed. After several of these portraits, you can step out and try a simple sketch using the tools you have learned. But in general (and this goes for experienced artists too), you will always have to have a picture or model to go off of to get the picture to look like a specific person. Help hint: Using a grid is the easiest way. You can purchase drawing grids, or make your own by drawing a quarter inch grid on a clear sheet to place over your original picture. You then lightly draw another grid of the same size on you drawing paper which you will erase after the sketch is complete and before the shading is started. 
  2. If all else fails, go stand in front of a mirror, and just stare at yourself for a good long while; noticing where different things are placed, how far apart, and how they are shaded in a rather general way. But it is NOT my suggestion to try to start here. It can all be too confusing if you don’t have too much of an idea what to look for. Where I like to use this is when I am sketching freehand (not off of a picture), and forgot where on earth something is placed or how it is shaded.
  3. Lastly, have fun! It’s truly not a science. People come in all shapes and sizes, so if you flub up… don’t worry. Just try again!

I would also like to point you to another post, Feeling Hopeless? I Was Too! where I share more, as well as some great links!